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Where the Water Tastes Like Wine Creator Talks Difficulties in Production

Where the Water Tastes Like Wine

Developer Dim Bulb Games detailed its dilemma of piecing together 16 unique stories, each written independently by established individuals, for Where the Water Tastes Like Wine.

Where the Water Tastes Like Wine is a narrative game filled with a collection of bleak short stories on people let down by the American dream, and while each story is standalone in nature, all of them are connected by a common theme that the developer finds challenging to collate while keeping his final vision intact. Johnnemann Nordhagen, Fullbright co-founder and a one-man team developer on Dim Bulb Games, told GameIndustryBiz “it was a really difficult job finding a vision, communicating a vision, and keeping everyone on the same page as well as being responsible for those decisions at the end of the day.”

Unlike Nordhagen’s time during Gone Home where he had three peers to collaborate on the game’s progress and decision making, in Where the Water Tastes Like Wine, he has no one to “check ideas against.” Nordhagen says, “Trying to make decisions just on my own was incredibly daunting, especially about things I don’t have a lot of experience with like music composition, artistic decisions, and even production stuff. I feel like I’ve learned more than I ever have before in such a short period of my life by trying to do this game and manage all this myself.”

In Where the Water Tastes Like Wine, players explore a Great Depression-set America via a cursed hobo-like man who wanders the US to collect interesting stories. Each story is written by a talented author in order to give all characters a unique voice. Exploring the huge world also looks pleasant due to the enthralling music and evocative art style, which can be glimpsed in the video below.

At present, Nordhagen aims to bring the game to Steam in late 2017 or early 2018, with the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One releases planned shortly after. However, Nordhagen originally intended Where the Water Tastes Like Wine to be a “small scope game,” but has already taken three years to develop.

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